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Book Review: Hellenic Orders, Decorations and Medals

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by George Beldecos, Athens 1991. Hard and softback 28 x 21cm, 174pp 198 colour plates and illustrations. Text in Greek but all photo captions translated in English. Available from Hellenic War Museum, 2 Rizari Street, Athens 139.

The medallic awards of Greece reflect to a remarkable extent the tortuous and troubled history of that lovely land. From monarchy to republic, back again to monarchy, with the occasional military dictatorship for good measure, there have been an astonishing and complicated series of alterations in the insignia of awards. In addition to that, the constant changes of manufacturers throughout Europe and the occasional imprecise design instructions have also led to many variations. It would be safe to say that there are very few real experts in the Greek numismatic scene and the few which do exist are ever prepared for fresh discoveries.
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The Royal Irish With No Booze!

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by Ed Sullivan

The excellent article in JOURNAL No 17 on the subject of Army Temperance Medals brought to mind the affair of the Royal Irish Regiment and the Black Mountain Expedition of 1888 (see JOURNAL No 4, p19).

The Commander-in-Chief in India, General Sir Frederick Roberts VC (Bobs to the troops) decided that no field canteen would accompany the expedition - it was to be teetotal! Within two months the affair was over, the Hassanzais and Akazais had made their peace with the Indian Government and the Indian General Service Medal with clasp HAZARA 1888 was granted to the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish and other troops who took part.
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Garda Siochana Long Service Medal

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by E.H. O’Toole

Introduced in 1921 at the same time as the Garda Jubilee Medal (JOURNAL No. 11, page 35) this medal is awarded to all members of the Garda Siochana who complete twenty-two years continuous, exemplary service. It takes precedence after the Scott Medal and before the Jubilee Medal. It is a silver coloured medal 34mm in diameter and is issued unnamed.
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Caveat Emptor

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Anyone thinking of purchasing some of the more important Soviet orders and decorations which are coming on to the market should consider the following from the DAILY MAIL of 9 April, 1991:
“Eight years ago retired Vice Admiral Kholostyakov and his wife were murdered in their Moscow apartment by criminals whose target was the old man’s personal decorations and medals. The killers were found and the medals eventually deposited in the Museum of Combat Glory of the Pacific Fleet. Now they’ve been stolen again by thieves aware of their high black market value.”
 

South African Irish Units - Their Badges and Medals

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by Michael Kavanagh

There has been an Irish presence in South Africa for nearly two centuries and it is hardly surprising therefore that there should be military units in that area with a strong Irish flavour.

The first such unit appears to have been an Irish Company in the Volunteer force known as Prince Alfred’s Guard, extant during the period 1856 to 1966. Initially the Irish Company, styled “5th Irish Coy, Prince Alfred’s Guard” wore the standard cap badge of the unit (Fig. 1) but in 1878 adopted a distinctive badge consisting of the Leinster harp surmounted by a Queen’s Crown (Fig. 2). The Guard was entitled to the following medals for services rendered:
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Great War Statistics

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The table which appears below is quite fascinating, note for example that Austria suffered an incredible ninety percent of casualties in relation to mobilised strength while Japan had point two of one percent. Japan’s three (3) missing soldiers compares rather favourably with Russia’s two and a half million and the Central Powers twenty-three million mobilised were just over half of those of the Allies.
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The Fighting Sullivans

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I refer to the badge of the U.S. Naval Destroyer ‘U.S.S. THE SULLIVANS’, illustrated in our Journal No. 13 of Aug. 1990, and to the request for further information. The following article is based on information supplied by Patrick Barnard of Tonawanda, U.S.A.

In spite of U.S. Navy policy preventing siblings from serving at the same duty, or on the same ship simultaneously, five Irish-American brothers managed to persuade the authorities to allow them to serve on the light cruiser U.S.S. JUNEAU. The brothers were Joseph, Francis, Albert, Madison and George Sullivan, of Waterloo, Iowa, sons of Thomas and Alleta Sullivan.

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The First and Second Transport Companies, UNOSOM 2

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by T. O’Neill

As a follow on to my short article on the 1st Transport Company published in Journal No 25, I have illustrated below the three Unit titles that are available from the two Companies, the second of which is now serving in Somalia, whose members have the distinction of being the only ‘white’ troops in theatre. Also illustrated is the medal ribbon for UNOSOM 2, the colours are as follows: a central UN blue stripe 10mm wide, bordered on each side by a dark green stripe 2mm wide and on the outside a yellow stripe 10mm wide.
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Bravery Awards for R.U.C. Officers

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Two R.U.C. Officers, Reserve Constable Russell Kane, age 32, and P.C. Robert Austin, age 38, are to receive Royal Humane Society testimonials for saving a distraught woman after she jumped into the River Lagan in Belfast after she had a row with her boyfriend.

Should any of our Northern Ireland members or indeed any member, have, or come across any further information on the above I would be delighted to hear from them.
 

Red Cross Award for Irish Nurse

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The President of the Republic of Ireland, Mrs. Mary Robinson presented a Cork city born nurse with the prestigious 1993 Florence Nightingale medal on the 10th November 1993.

A longstanding member of the Irish Red Cross, nurse Eileen Keane of Murgasty, Tipperary, received the highest honour for nursing services the International Committee of the Red Cross can bestow for her “exceptional” dedication and pioneering work in the promotion of nursing care in the home.”
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Charles Reginald Fausset

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Scholar, sportsman, schoolmaster, and soldier

by Roger Willoughby

The Faussets were a prominent Anglo-Irish family, with several members in the church, constabulary and other professions. Robert Fausset was born in about 1812 in Co Fermanagh, the son of Charles Fausset (noted as a Solicitor in Chancery at 2 North Anne Street, Dublin in 1820; Pigot, 1820). Educated at Trinity College Dublin, Fausset became a scholar of the college in 1830 and graduated with a BA degree in 1835. He then served for a time as a lieutenant with the Fermanagh Yeomanry. On 15 November 1842 he married Jane Elizabeth de Clifford (1819-), daughter of Herbert John de Clifford (c1789-1855) and Lucinda Hamilton (1793-) of Cloonlurg, Sligo. Appointed to the Irish Constabulary, he became a Sub-Inspector (third class) in on 2 May 1843. Promoted County Inspector on 26 September 1868, Robert Fausset died on 2 January 1877 in Armagh. From his marriage to Sligo woman Jane Elizabeth De Clifford, Fausset had among other children two sons: Charles (1843-1925) and William Willoughby Bernard (1853/5-1918).

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A Dickie Bird in Clancy Barracks

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by Liam Dodd

The military barracks along the river Liffey started its life in 1798 as the Royal Artillery Barracks, Islandbridge Dublin. Later in the 19th Century it was extended northward with the addition of a cavalry barracks. The first name change of the barracks came after the War of Independence to Clancy after Peadar Clancy. The Irish Defence Forces would remain in the barracks until the Government and Minster of Defence decided to sell, as it was surplus to requirments. Initially in 1998 when there was talk of the Department of Defence selling off the land, Dublin City Council engaged in negotiations which would have meant that the site would be used for social and affordable housing. These negotiations collapsed and the site went for tender with Florence Properties buying the land and barracks in 2002 for more than 25 million. With a frontage of over 170 metres to the River Liffey the new owner changed the name to Clancy Quay.

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Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 - 1st Bn. The Royal Irish Regiment

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The Delhi Durbar Medal was issued to commemorate the Coronation Durbar of 1911 and was issued in gold and silver. Just over 200 gold medals were issued to Indian rulers and senior government officials. About 30,000 silver medals were issued, with about 10,000 going to the British and Indian Armies - 21 of these wre issued to the 1st Bn. of the Royal Irish Regiment. A clasp was issued to recipients of the 1911 Coronation Medal (approx. 130 to the Indian army).

The medal was issued unnamed with a dark blue ribbon having two thin red centre stripes. 

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Officers Medals: Bar Pegu 18th R.I.R.

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By Derek A.J. Lister

After collecting medals in general for over thirty years it is only within the last five years that I have become interested in the Indian General Service Medal 1854, (I.G.S. ’54) especially bar ‘PEGU’, to officers only. Part of my collection is devoted to the 18th. R.I.R. (Royal Irish Regiment) who took a leading part in this campaign, and like most other Regiments involved lost most of the very heavy casualties to disease rather than to enemy action.  

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Identification Parade - What is it No. 17

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Silver coloured, concave enamelled badge with yellow enamelled sunburst above and blue enamelled lines and lettering. There is a vertical stickpin on the reverse.

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Cloth Insignia of the I.D.F. (Part 5)

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D-FCA 1959-1968

by J. McDonnell

With the integration of the F.C.A. in 1959, the shoulder titles were immediately obsolete.

Around 1961/62 shoulder titles started to reappear in some of the Dublin units only, these were larger in size than the pre-integration F.C.A. titles and were embroidered onto melton cloth.
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Cloth Insignia of the I.D.F. (Part 6)

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by J. McDonnell

E. Shoulder Flashes 1968 - to date.

1968 was selected as a breakpoint, in that year the late Col. C.J. Burke, the then O.C. of the 6th Brigade, issued an instruction on unit insignia for his brigade. He adopted two common features with an optional third:

(a) The Brigade symbol - a pike head to be common to all units, and

(b) The split shield.
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Cloth Insignia of the I.D.F. (Part 7)

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by J. McDonnell

 

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Irish Army, Snipers Badge

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by T. O’Neill

Towards the end of last year, 1994, the Irish Army introduced a sniper qualification badge which is to be awarded to all personnel who successfully complete a sniper course. This badge has no connection with the existing marksman badges.
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Ireland’s U.N. Heroes

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AN BONN MILEATA CALMACHTA

(THE MILITARY MEDAL FOR GALLANTRY)


The Military Medal for Gallantry is the highest military honour in the State. It may be awarded in recognition of the performance of any act of exceptional bravery or gallantry arising out of, or associated with, Military Service and involving risk to life or limb. There are three classes: with honour, with distinction, and with merit. These equate to the three former classes (pre-December 1984): 1st Class, 2nd Class, and 3rd Class. The old classification is used here for consistency.

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New Air Corps Epaulette Rank Insignia - Officers

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by R.A. Fenton

The shaded areas below represent the Silver Grey stripes.

The background is Air Corps blue, the wide stripes are 14mm wide, the narrow ones are 7mm wide and the stripes are 6mm apart.

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Newsflash

Journal Articles

 

 

The MSOI's stock of articles for the journal has for all practical purposes been used up.

All articles that have an Irish connection and are related to one or more of the areas of interest of our Members listed below are welcome for inclusion. 

·       The disbanded and existing Irish regiments of the British Army.

·       The Militia and Volunteers in Ireland.

·       Irish individuals and units who saw service in British Empire, Commonwealth and overseas armies and civil emergency services.

·       The Royal Irish Constabulary, Dublin Metropolitan Police, Royal Ulster Constabulary and Garda Siochana.

·       The Irish Defence Forces since 1922.

·       The Civil and Emergency Services of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland

We also welcome articles from non-members.

If at all possible articles should be submitted in electronic format, either via email or on cd via letter post. If you have a type-written or hand-written article which you would like to submit please forward it by post and we will convert it.

Any member who wishes to submit an article can do so  

- via e-mail to mjwalsh@eircom.net 

- by post to Michael Walsh, Computer Centre, 4th Floor Kane Building, UCC, Cork.