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UNIFIL Badge Update

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by Tom 0'Neill

The colour and pattern of the UNIFIL titles remains unchanged with the now seemingly standard combination of yellow details and border on a green background.

The present Units are the 88th Battalion and the 43rd Irish Component.

The decision appears to have been taken that the next Units will see an end of Irish large scale involvement in the region, but this remains to be seen.
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Cloth U.N. Insignia of the I.D.F.

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Rarities Department 3 - Royal Serbian Order of Milosh the Great

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On the night of 29 May 1903 a group of army officers staged a coup in Belgrade, capital of the Kingdom of Serbgia, in the course of which they assassinated King Alexander I, Queen Draga, Ministers of State, generals and members of the Court - a true Balkan bloodbath. This ended the Obrenovic dynasty which had been in power since 1858 and the rival Karageorovic family took over. They were to remain in power in Serbia and then in Jugoslavia until ousted by the communists at the end of WW2.

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Cloth Insignia of the Irish Defence Forces - U.N. Titles

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Maritime Squadron Patches

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by Tom O'Neill

Illustrated is the set of four flying suit patches worn by crew members of the Air Corps CASA 235 maritime patrol aircraft, two of which are operated by the Squadron. The CASA is depicted on the patch and on the top left corner is the Irish tri-colour. The patches are 105mm x 60mm.

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The Royal Irish Regiment Badges and Buttons

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The Royal Irish Regiment was brought on to the English establishment on April 1st 1684, under the command of Col. Arthur Forbes, the first Earl of Granard.

Badges:  Maid of Erin Harp, surmounted by a crown, with a scroll beneath, bearing the title ''the Royal Irish Regiment”. This varied according to the type of headdress worn at particular periods, with the mitre cap, it was a huge Maid Of Erin, crown and scroll about ten inches high. With the coming of the Shako an eight-pointed star was used, surmounted by a crown with a Maid of Erin in the centre with the Roman numerals XVIII. On the pill box cap just the numerals XVIII were used. A different badge was used for the Glengarry which consisted of a circular band inscribed with the words Royal Irish, surmounted by a rampant lion from the arms of Nassau, in the middle of a circle a Sphinx inscribed with the word ''Egypt'' with a dragon inscribed with China underneath and at the bottom the figure 18. Another version of this had the figure 18 beneath the Sphinx.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 May 2009 16:25 Register to read more...
 

Meritorious Service Awards to the Royal Irish Regiment

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by Michael A. Kavanagh

The meritorious service medal was instituted in 1845 and carried with it an annuity. The medal was issued to reward long serving senior non-commissioned officers of the regular army.

In 1844 the warrant was extended to all soldiers above the rank of Corporal. In 1916 the warrant was further extended to include non-commissioned officers below the rank of sergeant and to men for valuable and meritorious service.*

Last Updated on Saturday, 10 October 2009 11:53 Register to read more...
 

A Small Group of War Graves

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by Michael Kavanagh

The large war cemeteries scattered around the world are well known to most collectors, but now and again we hear of smaller and much less well known ones. I recently came across some such in a booklet entitled THE MARCOING GROUP OF CEMETERIES IN FRANCE, published by the Imperial War Graves Commission (now the Commonwealth War Graves Commission) in London in 1929. 

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Blueshirts and Their Insignia

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by Michael Kavanagh

"The Blueshirt made its first appearance in Irish politics in April 1933 when it was adopted as the official uniform of the already existing Army Comrades Association. The impact of this movement was immediate and dramatic. Within a matter of months, it had members and branches in all parts of the State. Nothing like it had ever been seen before. It was new and vigorous and colourful. It was also unpredictable. Its coming coincided with a point in time when shirted movements were fighting for power in virtually every country in Europe, and had attained it in some - movements as varied as the Blackshirts in Italy, the Brownshirts of Germany, Mosley's British Union of Fascists, the Spanish Falange, and indeed many more.

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A Whisper From Long Ago

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by Lieut. M. Fitzgerald MC, 6th BN. RL. IR. REGT.

The Wyschaete-Messines Ridge, our objective for June 7th 1917, was a shell ravaged feature near the Franco-Belgian border some five miles south of Ypres. It was about two miles long and rose fairly gently from our trenches to a height about a mile away, of 200 feet or so above our positions. The Germans had held it since the early days of the war, much to our disadvantage, and now we were going to knock them off it. The Royal Engineers had thoroughly mined the ridge and packed it with powerful explosive along its entire length. Artillery of every calibre was parked densely in the wooded areas around Kemmel. Machine guns were mounted everywhere around our positions to hammer the Germans with a lethal hail the moment the battle opened. Zero hour was to be 3:10 am on Thursday 7th June. So our front line trenches began to fill with troops as soon as darkness fell on the evening of the 6th. By midnight our lines were filled with tense young men from the towns, cities and farms of Ireland. About 11 pm, 2nd Lieut. T.M. Wall, a fellow officer, passed me on his way to his own platoon.
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Cloth Insignia of the I.D.F. (Part 15)

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by J. McDonnell

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Award of the M.M.G.

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From "An Cosantoir"

29 Inf Bn Soldier decorated for bravery under fire.

Pte Paul Coventry, 29 Inf Bn, has been awarded the nation's highest medal for bravery after "displaying exceptional bravery and compassion" while serving with 'A' Coy, 71 Inf Bn, in South Lebanon. PTE DECLAN POWER, Public Relations Section, looks at the background to the tragic events which led to this award. 

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Philosopher, Sailor, Police Chief

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During the first half of the nineteenth century, Bantry was home to many famous Irishmen. The bravest and most daring of them all was Chief Superintendent Francis O'Neill of the Chicago Police Force, born August 25th, 1849 in Tralibane, Bantry, Co. Cork.

Because of his brilliance at English, Maths and Draughtsmanship, Francis was nicknamed “Philosopher O’Neill” at the local National School. At fifteen he was offered a post as teacher but when an older brother insisted on the teaching salary being ploughed back into the family farm, Francis ran away from home.
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Irish Military Badge Update

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by Tom O'Neill

Souvenir Patch from U.N.I.F.I.L. 

To celebrate twenty years of Irish military service with U.N.I.F.I.L., the 83rd Battalioin produced a commemorative patch illustrated below. The written detail is yellow on a navy blue background, the dove is white and it is carrying a green olive branch in its beak (the olive branch may not appear in the illustrations below). 

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The Soldier's Family

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Hints for Wives and Friends

Some Useful Memoranda

by Liam Dodd

Some amount of hardship is at present being experienced by soldiers' dependents, owing to ignorance of the required procedure in obtaining what is due to them. The War Office is doing everything possible for dependents, but the co-operation of the latter is essential for smooth working of the arrangements. 

Carelessness on the part of newly-joined soldiers or their wives is the usual cause of the latter finding difficulty in obtaining separation allowances. Men on joining the Army are supplied with two forms on which to enter particulars of their marriage and the births of their chidren. One form is retained by the military authorities, and the other should be given or sent by the recruit to his wife. It is essential that he should be careful to do this if trouble regarding payment is to be avoided.

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He Got Two

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by Ed Sullivan

Barrack Street in Waterford City is unusual in that it had two British Army barracks in the same street. The artillery barracks with its fine sweeping views of the southern approaches to the city was burned down in 1922, and the military barracks which is still in use. This is where, in 1859, a young Lieutenant on leave from India on the Barrack square was introduced to the daughter of Captain Bews of the 73rd Foot. They married that year but the honeymoon was interrupted by a summons to Buckingham Palace on June 8th, so that the Queen might decorate the Lieutenant with his Victoria Cross. The Lieutenant was later to rise to the rank of Field Marshal and become Lord Roberts VC of Kandahar and Waterford. 

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Queens South Africa Medal of the Volunteer Company Royal Irish Regiment

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by Michael Kavanagh

Service in the South African War 1899 - 1902 for volunteer companies was authorised by Army Order 29 February 1900, and February 1901 and by Army Order 41 of February 1901.

The Irish Volunteer Companies were taken from:-

A. The 5th (Irish) Volunteer Battalion of The King's (Liverpool) Regiment, for service with the Royal Irish Regiment.

B. The 16th Middlesex (London Irish) Volunteer Battalion, for service with The Royal Irish Rifles.

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Some Thoughts on the Medal of Honor and the Victoria Cross

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By E.H. O’Toole

“Comparisons are invidious,” said some sage or another. There are times when one has to agree with the sentiment and other times when comparisons seem to be inevitable. Discussion occasionally arises among medal collectors on the relative merits of gallantry decorations and nowhere is there more disagreement than when comparison is made between the U.S. Medal of Honor and the British Victoria Cross, in the western world, at least, the most prestigious of gallantry awards. So let us consider some aspects of the argument and attempt to determine why it is, for example, that a genuine named MOH can be bought for around $2,000 while a VC can fetch up to £110,000 and rarely less than £20,000.

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Decorations Awarded for the Irish Rebellion 1916

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Distinguished Service Order


 Lt Col J.M. Blair
 Gordon Highlanders
 Major M.J. Christie
 Royal Flying Corps
 Major G.A. Harris
 Staff
 Major J.F. Nelson
 10th Hussars
 Major I.H. Price
 Staff
 Captain A.H. Quibell
 Notts and Derby Regt
 Captain F. Rayner
 Notts and Derby Regt
 Lt Col T.A. Salt
 11th Hussars
 Major H.F. Somerville  Rifle Brigade

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Wreck of the Transport “Sea Horse” at Tramore 1816

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by Ed Sullivan

The 2nd Bn 59th (East Lancashire) Regt had been protecting the road from Brussels through Hal at the time of the Battle of Waterloo but escaped any serious military engagement at the time, although menaced by some 5,000 French cavalry. They were then quartered in France for a few months until ordered to Ireland, embarking in three transports on 24 January 1816. One of these vessels, the SEA HORSE, a transport of 350 tons burthen, was wrecked in Tramore Bay on 30 January 1816. She had on board nearly 400 souls, only 31 of whom were saved. The sea “ran mountains high,” the vessel struck at 12 midday and her mizzen and main masts were at once cut away. Some of the children were saved by being put in chests and so washed to shore by the waves.

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Can We Afford to go to War?

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by George Callaghan

EXTRACTS FROM “PRICED VOCABULARY OF STORES” USED IN HIS MAJESTY’S SERVICE


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